Archive for the ‘Levy Institute’ Category

Apply Now for the 2017 Minsky Summer Seminar

Michael Stephens | October 24, 2016

If you’re a grad student or just starting out your career and want to learn more about the work of Hyman Minsky and Wynne Godley, and wouldn’t mind doing so in a turn-of-the-century manor on the banks of the Hudson, you’re in luck.

The Levy Institute’s annual Minsky Summer Seminar is now accepting applications for the June 2017 session:

minsky-summer-2016_group

The Levy Economics Institute is pleased to announce that it will hold the eighth Minsky Summer Seminar June 10–16, 2017. The Seminar will provide a rigorous discussion of both the theoretical and applied aspects of Minsky’s economics, with an examination of meaningful prescriptive policies relevant to the current economic and financial outlook. It will also provide an introduction to Wynne Godley’s stock-flow consistent modeling methods via hands-on workshops.

The Summer Seminar will be of particular interest to graduate students, recent graduates, and those at the beginning of their academic or professional careers. The teaching staff will include well-known economists working in the tradition of Minsky.

To apply, send a letter of application and current curriculum vitae to Kathleen Mullaly at the Levy Institute (mullaly@levy.org). Admission to the Summer Seminar includes room and board on the Bard College campus. A registration fee of $250 is required upon acceptance.

Due to space constraints, the Seminar will be limited to 30 participants. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis beginning in January 2017.

The 2017 Summer Seminar program will be organized by Jan Kregel, Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, and L. Randall Wray.

levy-garden_summer-sem

Below the fold is a copy of the 2016 program, to give a sense of the sort of topics and speakers featured at the Seminar (note the guest speakers do change from one year to the next): continue reading…

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Levy M.S. Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2017

Michael Stephens | October 5, 2016

levy-ms-banner

Designed as a terminal degree with a professional focus, the Levy Economics Institute Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy offers students an alternative to mainstream graduate programs in economics and finance. This innovative two-year program combines a rigorous course of study with exceptional opportunity to participate in advanced economics research, with direct access to the Institute’s global network of researchers.

Application deadlines are November 15 for Early Decision and January 15 for Regular Decision. Scholarships are available. Visit bard.edu/levyms for more information. Click here to apply.

Learn about the Levy M.S. by joining one of our online information sessions hosted by Institute scholars:

Wednesday, October 5, 3:00 p.m. EDT, with Research Scholar Michalis Nikiforos
Tuesday, October 11, 11:00 a.m. EDT, with Ajit Zacharias, Senior Scholar and Distribution of Income and Wealth Program Director
Tuesday, October 18, 10:00 a.m. EDT, with Senior Scholar and Bard College Professor of Economics L. Randall Wray

The program application fee will be waived for all prospective students who attend. Click here for details.

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Listen in on the Minsky Conference

Michael Stephens | April 11, 2016

Audio from the 25th Annual Minsky Conference will be broadcast live. Listen here beginning tomorrow at 9am.

Tuesday, April 12

9:00−9:15 a.m. Welcome and Introduction
Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, President, Levy Institute
9:15−10:30 a.m. Session 1. GLOBAL FRAGILITY AND EMERGING MARKETS OUTLOOK
MODERATOR: Theo Francis, Special Writer, The Wall Street Journal
SPEAKER: Jan Kregel, Director of Research, Levy Institute; Professor, Tallinn University of Technology
Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho, Senior Scholar, Levy Institute; Emeritus Professor of Economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
10:30 a.m. − 12:30 p.m. Session 2. COMMODITIES AND DERIVATIVES REGULATION
MODERATOR: Izabella Kaminska, Journalist, Financial Times
SPEAKERS: Robert A. Johnson, President, Institute for New Economic Thinking; Senior Fellow and Director, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute
Michael Masters, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Better Markets
12:30−2:15 p.m. Lunch
SPEAKER: Robert J. Barbera, Codirector, Center for Financial Economics, The Johns Hopkins University
“Six Degrees of Separation: Why the Fed’s Strategy of Precautionary Unemployment Is Nutty”
2:15−4:45 p.m. Session 3. IS THE CURRENT CREDIT STRUCTURE CONDUCIVE TO FINANCIALLY STABLE RECOVERY?
MODERATOR: Jesse Eisinger, Senior Reporter, ProPublica
SPEAKERS: Henry Kaufman, President, Henry Kaufman & Company, Inc.
Richard Berner, Director, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury
Martin L. Leibowitz, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley
Albert M. Wojnilower, Economic Consultant, Craig Drill Capital
4:45−6:45 p.m. Session 4. MINSKY, INEQUALITY, AND THE MONETARY/FISCAL POLICY OUTLOOK
MODERATOR: Jan Kregel, Director of Research, Levy Institute; Professor, Tallinn University of Technology
SPEAKERS: Viral V. Acharya, C. V. Starr Professor of Economics, New York University Stern School of Business
Scott Fullwiler, Professor of Economics and James A. Leach Chair in Banking and Monetary Economics, Wartburg College
Stephanie A. Kelton, Research Associate, Levy Institute; Chief Economist, US Senate Budget Committee; Professor, University of Missouri—Kansas City

Wednesday, April 13

continue reading…

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Preliminary Program for the 25th Minsky Conference

Michael Stephens | March 24, 2016

The preliminary program has been posted for the 25th Annual Hyman Minsky Conference, being held April 12-13 here at Blithewood on the Bard College campus.

The deadline for registration is April 1st.

Tuesday, April 12

8:30−9:00 a.m. Registration
9:00−9:15 a.m. Welcome and Introduction
Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, President, Levy Institute
9:15−10:30 a.m. Session 1. GLOBAL FRAGILITY AND EMERGING MARKETS OUTLOOK
MODERATOR: Theo Francis, Special Writer, The Wall Street Journal
SPEAKER: Jan Kregel, Senior Scholar, Levy Institute; Professor, Tallinn University of Technology
Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho, Senior Scholar, Levy Institute; Emeritus Professor of Economics, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
10:30 a.m. − 12:30 p.m. Session 2. COMMODITIES AND DERIVATIVES REGULATION
MODERATOR: Izabella Kaminska, Journalist, Financial Times
SPEAKERS: Michael Greenberger, Professor, School of Law, and Director, Center for Health and Homeland Security, The University of Maryland
Robert A. Johnson, President, Institute for New Economic Thinking; Senior Fellow and Director, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute
Michael Masters, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Better Markets
12:30−2:15 p.m. Lunch
SPEAKER: Robert J. Barbera, Codirector, Center for Financial Economics, The Johns Hopkins University
“Six Degrees of Separation: Why the Fed’s Strategy of Precautionary Unemployment Is Nutty”
2:15−4:45 p.m. Session 3. IS THE CURRENT CREDIT STRUCTURE CONDUCIVE TO FINANCIALLY STABLE RECOVERY?
MODERATOR: TBD
SPEAKERS: Henry Kaufman, President, Henry Kaufman & Company, Inc.
Richard Berner, Director, Office of Financial Research, US Department of the Treasury
Martin L. Leibowitz, Managing Director, Morgan Stanley
Albert M. Wojnilower, Economic Consultant, Craig Drill Capital
4:45−6:45 p.m. Session 4. MINSKY, INEQUALITY, AND THE MONETARY/FISCAL POLICY OUTLOOK
MODERATOR: TBD
SPEAKERS: Viral V. Acharya, C. V. Starr Professor of Economics, New York University Stern School of Business
Scott Fullwiler, Professor of Economics and James A. Leach Chair in Banking and Monetary Economics, Wartburg College
Stephanie A. Kelton, Research Associate, Levy Institute; Chief Economist, US Senate Budget Committee; Professor, University of Missouri—Kansas City
6:45−7:15 p.m. Reception
7:15 p.m. Dinner

Wednesday, April 13

9:00−11:30 a.m. Session 5. US ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FORECAST
MODERATOR: Eduardo Porter, Columnist, The New York Times
SPEAKERS: Lakshman Achuthan, Cofounder and Chief Operations Officer, Economic Cycle Research Institute
Bruce C. N. Greenwald, Robert Heilbrunn Professor of Finance and Asset Management, Columbia University
Michalis Nikiforos, Research Scholar, Levy Institute
Frank Veneroso, President, Veneroso Associates, LLC
11:30 a.m. − 1:30 p.m. Session 6. BANK REGULATION, TOO BIG TO FAIL, AND LIQUIDITY
MODERATOR: Peter Eavis, Reporter, The New York Times
SPEAKERS: Edward Kane, Professor of Finance, Boston College
Walker F. Todd, Trustee, American Institute for Economic Research
L. Randall Wray, Senior Scholar, Levy Institute; Professor of Economics, Bard College
1:30−3:15 p.m. Lunch
SPEAKER: Barney Frank, Former US Representative (D-MA, 4)
3:15−5:15 p.m. Session 7. EUROPEAN PERFORMANCE AND REGULATORY OUTLOOK
MODERATOR: TBD
SPEAKERS: Emilios Avgouleas, Chair, International Banking Law and Finance, School of Law, University of Edinburgh
Mario Tonveronachi, Professor of the Economics of Financial Systems, University of Siena
Loukas Tsoukalis, Pierre Keller Visiting Professor, Harvard University
5:15−7:00 p.m. SPEAKER: Vítor Constâncio, Vice President, European Central Bank
“A Challenging International Economic Environment for Central Banks”

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Minsky Summer Seminar: Apply Before March 1st

Michael Stephens | February 9, 2016

The deadline to apply for this year’s Hyman P. Minsky Summer Seminar is approaching:

Organized by the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College with support from the Ford Foundation

Levy Institute
Blithewood
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York

June 10–18, 2016

The seventh Minsky Summer Seminar will be held at the Levy Economics Institute in June 2016. The annual Summer Seminar provides a rigorous discussion of both the theoretical and applied aspects of Minsky’s economics, with an examination of meaningful prescriptive policies relevant to the current economic and financial crisis. Organized by Jan Kregel, Dimitri B. Papadimitriou, and L. Randall Wray, the Seminar program is geared toward graduate students and those at the beginning of their academic or professional careers. The teaching staff includes well-known economists concentrating on and expanding Minsky’s work.

Applications may be made to Kathleen Mullaly at the Levy Institute (mullaly@levy.org), and should include a current curriculum vitae. Admission to the Summer Seminar includes provision of room and board on the Bard College campus.

Due to limited space availability, the deadline for applications is March 1, 2016.

A user name and password are required for the Summer Seminar webpage; participating students may log in by clicking here.

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Registration Now Open for 25th Annual Hyman P. Minsky Conference

Michael Stephens | December 17, 2015

25th Minsky Conference Banner

The 2016 Minsky Conference will address whether what appears to be a global economic slowdown will jeopardize the implementation and efficiency of Dodd-Frank regulatory reforms, the transition of monetary policy away from zero interest rates, and the “new” normal of fiscal policy, as well as the use of fiscal policies aimed at achieving sustainable growth and full employment. Is economic policy leading to another Minsky moment?

Organized by the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College with support from the Ford Foundation

Levy Economics Institute of Bard College
Blithewood
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York 12504

April 12–13, 2016

The attendance fee is $75 and due upon registration. To register, click here.

Visit the conference website for more information about accommodations and directions to the Levy Institute. (Program details will be posted as they become available.)

A list of participants is below the fold: continue reading…

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Review: Minsky Matters and the Next Minsky Moment

Michael Stephens | December 2, 2015

From Edward Chancellor’s review in Reuters Breakingviews of L. Randall Wray’s Why Minsky Matters:

Minsky, who taught economics at the University of Washington in St Louis before ending up at the Levy Institute at Bard College, had little time for conventional economics with its emphasis on equilibrium, rational expectations and the view that money and finance were largely irrelevant: “Nobody ‘up there’ understands American capitalism,” he once contemptuously wrote. […]

When the credit crunch arrived, it provided posthumous support for Minsky’s economic vision. Subprime mortgages were revealed as a classic form of Ponzi finance. Losses of securitized debt cascaded through the financial system, prompting a liquidity crisis, exactly as described in Minsky’s work. The Great Moderation gave way to the Great Recession, and the Lehman bust became known as the ultimate example of a “Minsky moment.”

As a result, the crisis made Minsky something of a household name beyond strictly economic circles. Unfortunately, Minsky in the original isn’t an easy read. “He needs to be translated,” writes Wray, in the preface to “Why Minsky Matters.” As a former teaching assistant of Minsky’s and colleague at the Levy Institute, Wray is perfectly positioned to perform that task. Few people understand Minsky as well as Wray. Written in clear prose, with Minsky’s idiosyncratic ideas and language patiently explained, Wray provides the best general introduction to Minsky’s economics.

Read the whole thing here.

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25th Annual Minsky Conference Returns to Blithewood

Michael Stephens | November 10, 2015

The 2016 Minsky conference will be held here at Blithewood mansion, home of the Levy Institute. Barney Frank will be among the keynote speakers:

Will the Global Economic Environment Constrain US Growth and Employment?

Organized by the Levy Economics Institute of Bard College with support from the Ford Foundation

Levy Economics Institute of Bard College
Blithewood
Annandale-on-Hudson, New York 12504

April 12–13, 2016

The 2016 Minsky Conference will address whether what appears to be a global economic slowdown will jeopardize the implementation and efficiency of Dodd-Frank regulatory reforms, the transition of monetary policy away from zero interest rates, and the “new” normal of fiscal policy, as well as the use of fiscal policies aimed at achieving sustainable growth and full employment.

Participants

continue reading…

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Levy MS Program Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2016

Michael Stephens | September 10, 2015

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The Levy Economics Institute Master of Science in Economic Theory and Policy is a two-year degree program that emphasizes theoretical and empirical aspects of economic policy analysis through specialization in one of five key research areas: macroeconomic theory, policy, and modeling; monetary policy and financial structure; distribution of income, wealth, and well-being; gender equality and time poverty; and employment and labor markets. Headed by Levy Institute Research Director Jan Kregel, the MS program draws on the expertise of Institute scholars as well as selected Bard faculty.

Application deadlines for Fall 2016 are November 15 for Early Decision and January 15 for Regular Decision. Scholarships are available. For more information, visit the Levy MS website; to apply, go to connect.bard.edu/apply.

The Levy Institute welcomes two new senior scholars, both of whom have also joined the faculty of the Levy MS program:
Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho
Senior Scholar Fernando J. Cardim de Carvalho is emeritus professor of economics at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro. He has worked as a consultant to the Central Bank of Brazil and the Brazilian National Bank for Economic and Social Development, among other institutions, and is the author, most recently, of Liquidity Preference and Monetary Economies.
John F. Henry
Senior Scholar John F. Henry is professor emeritus, California State University, Sacramento, where he taught economics from 1970 to 2004. He also lectures at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. Henry’s research interests include the history of economic thought, economic history, and political economy, and he has published widely in the academic press.
Fernando Rios-Avila
Research Scholar Fernando Rios-Avila, who joined the Institute in 2013, is also new to the MS faculty this year. His research spans labor economics and applied microeconomics as well as development economics, poverty, and inequality.

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Working Paper Roundup 8/31/2015

Michael Stephens | August 31, 2015

A Nonbehavioral Theory of Saving
Michalis Nikiforos

“We present a model where the saving rate of the household sector, especially households at the bottom of the income distribution, becomes the endogenous variable that adjusts in order for full employment to be maintained over time. An increase in income inequality and the current account deficit and a consolidation of the government budget lead to a decrease in the saving rate of the household sector. Such a process is unsustainable because it leads to an increase in the household debt-to-income ratio, and maintaining it depends on some sort of asset bubble. This framework allows us to better understand the factors that led to the Great Recession and the dilemma of a repeat of this kind of unsustainable process or secular stagnation. Sustainable growth requires a decrease in income inequality, an improvement in the external position, and a relaxation of the fiscal stance of the government.”

Is a Very High Public Debt a Problem?
Pedro Leão

“we propose a policy architecture that differs from [Abba] Lerner’s in two aspects: it envisions a different way of preventing a very high public debt from ending in default, and it eliminates the burden associated with levying taxes to meet the interest payments on the debt (in one word, it eliminates the debt burden altogether). Our architecture requires flexible exchange rates. It involves (i) having the central bank impose near-zero nominal government bond yields for as long as necessary—a stance that should be accompanied by (ii) a replacement of monetary by fiscal policy as the instrument to control inflation.

A second objective of this paper is to show that government deficits associated with a full-employment fiscal policy do not face a financing problem. After these deficits are initially financed through the net creation of base money, the private sector’s savings always come in the form of government bond purchases or, if a default is feared, of ‘acquisitions’ of new money.”

Making the Euro Viable: The Euro Treasury Plan
Jörg Bibow

“The idea is to create a Euro Treasury as a vehicle to pool future eurozone public investment spending and have it funded by proper eurozone treasury securities. Member state governments would agree on the initial volume of common area-wide public investment spending and on the annual growth rate of public investment thereafter. Beyond that, the Euro Treasury operates on auto-pilot. … This is not simply another ‘euro bonds’ proposal, though. In particular, there is no debt mutualization of existing national debts involved here. Member states alone would remain responsible for their respective national public debt. …

As to the evolution of national public debts under the Euro Treasury plan, steady deficit spending on public investment funded at the center that is the basis of Europe’s common future will finally allow and enable national treasuries to (nearly) balance their structural current budgets. Within one generation, there will be little national public debt left to worry about. … In general, member states will experience a decline in their overall interest burden as cheaper debts replace more expensive debts over time. While mimicking the original Maastricht criteria of fiscal rectitude and stability at the union level, the overall outcome would also resemble the situation in another—functioning—currency union during normal times: the United States.”

Marx’s Theory of Money and 21st-century Macrodynamics
Tai Young-Taft

“Marx’s theory of money is critiqued relative to the advent of fiat and electronic currencies and the development of financial markets. Specific topics of concern include (1) today’s identity of the money commodity, (2) possible heterogeneity of the money commodity, (3) the categories of land and rent as they pertain to the financial economy, (4) valuation of derivative securities, and (5) strategies for modeling, predicting, and controlling production and exchange of the money commodity and their interface with the real economy.”

The Effects of a Euro Exit on Growth, Employment, and Wages
Riccardo Realfonzo and Angelantonio Viscione

“A technical analysis shows that the doomsayers who support the euro at all costs and those who naively theorize that a single currency is the root of all evil are both wrong. A euro exit could be a way of getting back to growth, but at the same time it would entail serious risks, especially for wage earners. The most important lesson we can learn from the experience of the past is that the outcome, in terms of growth, distribution, and employment, depends on how a country remains in the euro; or, in the case of a euro exit, on the quality of the economic policies that are put in place once the country regains control of monetary and fiscal matters, rather than on abandoning the old exchange system as such. …

Although the exit from a monetary union such the eurozone would be unprecedented, some important pointers can be found in the currency crises of the past that more closely resemble the present case. For this purpose, we will examine the currency crises that in recent history have entailed large devaluations of the exchange rate and that were accompanied by the abandoning of previous agreements or exchange systems. This allows us to take into account both the phenomenon of devaluation and the political-institutional changes that follow when exchanges regimes are abandoned.”

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